Carriage Journal magazine


It would seem that I’ve been missing in action for a week or so, while I was laying out the January issue of our CAA magazine, The Carriage Journal. We reviewed the (gorgeous, of course!) proofs of the issue yesterday, and I wanted to go ahead and share the pretty January cover with you here …

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First, I need to apologize to those of you who regularly check the blog … as I don’t seem to have posted anything at all last week! For the first half of the week, I was rushing to get the May issue of The Carriage Journal off to our printer. Then Thursday was devoted to catching up on several pressing issues. And Friday … well, Friday was a day off to take a few deep breaths and relax.

Just this morning, we reviewed the proofs of the issue, which will go out in the mail — to all current CAA members and CJ subscribers — on May first.

Here’s the lovely cover …

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Not yet a CAA member? Click here to learn more about the association and our beautiful magazine.

Sorry to have neglected you here for the past several days. I’ve been working (nearly) non-stop on the May issue of The Carriage Journal, plus taking care of a number of computer issues.

At any rate, here’s a photo of Court Square in Montgomery, Alabama, c. 1906. There are several horse-drawn vehicles, and others, moving through the streets. And quite a number waiting along the curbs … or, in one instance, in the middle of the street.

One of the things that continually amazes me in these old street-scene photos are the horses who are just standing by themselves, waiting — patiently, I assume — for their people.

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I’m working on the May issue of The Carriage Journal at the moment, and our featured “old image” in that issue will be this lovely old photo of a group of children who appear to be ready for a parade …

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old image - parade wagon

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According to a hand-written note on the back of this photo, this was taken on July 4, 1911.

Our thanks to the CMA Library & Archives for the image.

I’m finally starting to go through all the photos I took at last weekend’s horse-drawn artillery school.

I’ll share more of the photos next week (and in the August issue of The Carriage Journal), but for now, let’s take a look at the just-completed battery wagon.

There’s one (yes, ONE) original Civil War-era battery wagon left in the U.S. And there were five reproductions. This wagon, then, is number seven, and it was built according to the original, excruciatingly detailed specifications.

These four horses can confirm that the wagon (here, not yet loaded with all of the supplies it was meant to carry) is quite heavy. It would, in fact, normally be hitched to a team of six horses.

 

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© Jennifer Singleton / www.TheSingleFrame.com

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© Jennifer Singleton / www.TheSingleFrame.com

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Back in October 2012, at the annual reenactment of the Civil War battle at Perryville (here in Kentucky), A.J. and I met the members of a Tennessee-based horse-drawn artillery unit.

Turns out they host a “horse-drawn artillery school” each spring … and this year’s installment is this weekend. We’ll be there, gathering stories and photos, and probably shouting at each other because, of course, we’ll need to remember to wear our earplugs!

We’re both rather ridiculously excited about this opportunity, and looking forward to sharing photos and stories here on the blog and in an upcoming issue of The Carriage Journal. Stay tuned!

I apologize for not posting anything yesterday (it’s a long, boring story of technological challenges, with which I shall not bore you) … but here’s what I would’ve posted if I could have …

We received our “extra” copies of the March issue of The Carriage Journal, and it’s another gorgeous one!

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This issue contains articles on carriage collections in Sweden and Germany, a historic Break de Promenade that was recently restored in the Netherlands, a discussion of “restoration vs. conservation” as these two options relate to antique vehicles, and much more.

If you’re not yet a CAA member / Carriage Journal subscriber, but would like to learn more, be sure to visit the Carriage Association’s official website.

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