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I’m working on the May issue of The Carriage Journal at the moment, and our featured “old image” in that issue will be this lovely old photo of a group of children who appear to be ready for a parade …

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old image - parade wagon

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According to a hand-written note on the back of this photo, this was taken on July 4, 1911.

Our thanks to the CMA Library & Archives for the image.

I’m finally starting to go through all the photos I took at last weekend’s horse-drawn artillery school.

I’ll share more of the photos next week (and in the August issue of The Carriage Journal), but for now, let’s take a look at the just-completed battery wagon.

There’s one (yes, ONE) original Civil War-era battery wagon left in the U.S. And there were five reproductions. This wagon, then, is number seven, and it was built according to the original, excruciatingly detailed specifications.

These four horses can confirm that the wagon (here, not yet loaded with all of the supplies it was meant to carry) is quite heavy. It would, in fact, normally be hitched to a team of six horses.

 

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© Jennifer Singleton / www.TheSingleFrame.com

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© Jennifer Singleton / www.TheSingleFrame.com

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blog-BatteryWagon3-201403

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Back in October 2012, at the annual reenactment of the Civil War battle at Perryville (here in Kentucky), A.J. and I met the members of a Tennessee-based horse-drawn artillery unit.

Turns out they host a “horse-drawn artillery school” each spring … and this year’s installment is this weekend. We’ll be there, gathering stories and photos, and probably shouting at each other because, of course, we’ll need to remember to wear our earplugs!

We’re both rather ridiculously excited about this opportunity, and looking forward to sharing photos and stories here on the blog and in an upcoming issue of The Carriage Journal. Stay tuned!

Some CAA members have already received their mailed copy of the January issue of The Carriage Journal, but the folks who bring us our mail here at the Kentucky Horse Park have just today “found” our extra copies of the magazine. So I’m finally able to post an image of the cover here. Ta daaa …

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This issue features articles on sleigh types, harness makers Mark W. Cross & Co., the Butterfield Overland Trail in southern California, and much, much more.

Not yet a CAA member or CJ subscriber? Visit the Carriage Association online to learn more!

On Wednesday, I flew to western Michigan to photograph the carriages in this lovely carriage house (on the left); two sweet Morgan mares and a cute pony live in the barn on the right …
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As soon as I’ve downloaded and edited them all, some of the photos I took will appear in an upcoming issue of The Carriage Journal. Others will probably appear here on the blog, so stay tuned.

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To see a few off-topic-for-this-blog photos from my quick trip, head on over to my other blog: Sunlight on Stuff.

Today and tomorrow, we’re going back to the CIAT Cuts (held in Cuts, France, back in May). The second morning of the competition featured the “country drive” phase …

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To read more about the entire Cuts competition, see our (A.J.’s and my) article in the August issue of The Carriage Journal. And to see Jacinto Planas Ros (above) and his pair of Spanish horses negotiating one of the exciting driver’s tests during the cross-country drive, check back here tomorrow!

A.J. and I wrote an article about the Cuts CIAT (which, as you may recall, we visited in May) for the August issue of The Carriage Journal. To illustrate it, I went through the several hundred photos that we’d taken over the two days of competition … and selected about twenty “finalists.”

These few, for one reason or another, didn’t make the final cut and so won’t be in the pages of the magazine, but I wanted to go ahead and share them with you here. I do still plan to post more photos from Cuts; needless to say, those won’t be the same ones featured in the magazine. I’m hoping to do this next week, now that the August issue is FINISHED. I hope you enjoy these, and stay tuned for more … both here and in the magazine!

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With the chateau in the background, Dominique Posselle (France), driving a mixed pair to an original-condition dog-cart built in 1899, is heading out on Sunday morning’s cross-country drive …

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Antonio Gutierrez (Spain) brought a traditional Andalusian turnout to the Cuts event. The carriage is a roof-seat break, built by Brewster in 1870. Here, he’s driving up to the third and final judge’s stop in the presentation phase …

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John Brown (Great Britain), shown here on the cross-country-drive phase, drove a pair of Gelderlanders to a demi-mail phaeton built in 1844 …

 

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This was the first year at Cuts for the Percheron stallions of the local state stud farm at Haras …

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Hugo Livens (Belgium) and his pair of New Forest Ponies, put to a 1905 derby cart, are shown here on the cones course. This turnout won the cross-country and cones phases, and the overall award, in the pair-pony division …

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