the Bluegrass


As you might guess, the most exciting (and loudest) part of the horse-drawn-artillery demonstration at Perryville was when they shot the cannon, which they did several times.

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the gray-haired man (far right), a special-guest member of the horse-drawn artillery unit for the weekend, also participated in the 100th-anniversary reenactment of the Battle of Perryville … in 1962

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By the final time they fired the cannon, I was able to capture the entire sequence. This looks really neat when you’re able to scroll quickly through all three.

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[Still at Perryville …] Between their 11:00 a.m. demonstration and the 2:00 p.m. battle reenactment, the artillery horses had a bit of a rest:

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Last summer, I posted a series of old (but unfortunately, I don’t know how old) hand-drawn images of artillery harness. If you missed those, you can click back to see parts one, two, three, and four of that four-part series.

Today, I offer a few more photos from Perryville. Except for the one that is obviously a cannon, these show the Civil War-style artillery harness on the horses we met.

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While I prepare for my impending trip to Pennsylvania for Martin’s Auction (you’ll no doubt see more on that, later this week), I’m still stuck in “1862” here on the blog. Yes, I’m still working my way through our photos of the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. If you haven’t visited here in a while, you can scroll back through last week’s posts to read / see more about our visit to Perryville.

Around 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, before that afternoon’s big battle reenactment, we watched a demonstration by the one horse-drawn artillery unit in attendance. Not quite a full unit, in reality, as they had only one cannon, but you get the idea. And that one horse-drawn cannon (and several stationary versions) still made a powerfull (booming, you might say) impression during the battles.

Before the cannon could be delivered to the center of the field, dropped off, and put through its paces, we had to wait for a unit of Confederate infantry to finish their drill and clear the field …

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… before all of us spectators could move higher up on the hill … you know, out of range, and all that.

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Next, we’ll look at the artillery harness. And then stay tuned for some explosions!

After our wander around the various camps at Perryville, we (and lots of other people) gathered in a field to watch the 11:00 a.m. horse-drawn artillery demonstration.

This was our first glimpse of the lone horse-drawn artillery unit at this year’s reenactment.

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And here’s another look at the same horses and the cannon.

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Over the next couple of days, look for more artillery photos and information. We had quite a nice, long visit with the members of this horse-drawn-artillery unit, and we learned a lot!

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