harness


And, finally, drawing no. 4 shows the off-side leader:

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Following along in the expected sequence, drawing no. 3 in our series shows the near-side leader:

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Drawing no. 2 in our series of old, hand-drawn images of artillery harness shows the off-side wheeler:

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Some time ago, while looking for article inspiration for the (August) frontier / military issue of The Carriage Journal, we came across a file with several old drawings of artillery harness. These are clearly hand-drawn and quite old. But, unfortunately, there is nothing on any of the pages, or in the file, to indicate their age or whence they came.

So we’ll just have to enjoy.

This drawing, no. 1, shows the harness for the near-side wheeler. I’ll share the other three in the set over the next few (well, three) days.

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I don’t really think this is what BBC News had in mind when publishing this enormous, high-def photo, but we’ll do it anyway!

Click here to see the huge photo from last week’s huge wedding, where you can zoom waaaay in and move around to “find yourself in the crowd” … OR … you can zoom in to see all the beautiful details of the horses’ harness.

Enjoy.

For today’s entertainment / history lesson, I found the following poster, which was being given away (in 1898) as a large (9 x 16 inches) engraving, to all new and renewing subscribers to Rider & Driver magazine. The artist was the same C. Gray-Parker whose drawing of a Goddard Buggy graces the cover of the March issue of The Carriage Journal: http://bit.ly/eHqNdj.

This collage of “Types of Horse Show Exhibits” features a Thoroughbred, a four-in-hand road team, a Brougham horse, a polo pony, a trotting sire, a heavy-weight hunter, a Hackney, a gentleman’s park saddle hack, a lady’s park saddle hack, a charger, a Percheron, a French “coacher” (coach horse), a trotting mare in racing form, a Shetland pony, a Shetland foal, and a high-stepping Gig horse.

You can see them all here, and then, below this first image, I’ve extracted and enlarged all the harness horses so you can see the differences between the various harness and the horses themselves.

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"types of horse show exhibits" (from the April 30, 1898, issue of Rider & Driver)

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As a quick reference for those already familiar with harness parts, or as new information if you’re not already familiar with carriage harness, yesterday’s post featured a diagram of single harness.

Today, it’s pair harness:

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pair full-collar harness (line drawing by Joy Claxton)

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