carriage collections


As promised, here are a few close-up photos of exteriors and interiors of a few Romani caravans in the Jim Lawes & Harriet Crowther’s collection …

.

.

.

.

.

.

… and speaking of colorful vehicles, here are some of Jill’s photos of Jim Lawes & Harriet Crowther’s stunning collection of Romani caravans. If you have a copy of the October 2012 of The Carriage Journal, you can read (if you haven’t already!) Ken Wheeling’s article on this same collection.

.

.

.

.

.

Tomorrow, we’ll see a few close-up shots that Jill took of individual caravans.

One of my favorite classes at the Royal Windsor Horse Show is always the Light Trade Vehicles class. During the horse-drawn era, businesses all had their own specialty vehicles: each in a different size, shape, and style. And every one of them was, without fail, brightly painted and decorated.

Those in the small CAA group that traveled on to Norfolk from Windsor last week were fortunate to visit the impressive (and colorful!) carriage collection of Jim Lawes and Harriet Crowther. Jill took these photos of some of their trade vehicles …

.

.

.

.

.

.

Following the 2012 CAA / CWF International Carriage Symposium in January, Stephan Broeckx and a small group from France visited several U.S. carriage collectors in the northeast. One of their stops was with CAA member Dick Lahey. You can read Stephan’s story about that visit in the May issue of The Carriage Journal. We had room for only one photo to go with the story, so here, without further ado, are more of Stephan’s photos of the collection.

.

.

.

.

U.S. carriage collector Dick Lahey (left) and his French visitors

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Look for future blog posts with more of Stephan’s stories and photos from the group’s visits with several other carriage collectors.

CAA member Eli Anderson has gathered an extensive collection of carriages and other memorabilia of life in the rural West. And he’s working on putting everything together in one place — to be called Wagon Land Adventure — where visitors will be able to get a glimpse of life in the Old West. Fellow CAA member Craig Paulsen, also from Utah, says that Eli “is a wonderful advocate and collector of antique vehicles and a wealth of knowledge.”

Back in December 2010, Craig and fellow members Tom & Gloria Burgess (from Virginia) visited with Eli. If you missed it the first time, or want to see the photos again, you can read about their visit here

.

.

If the embedded video (showing some of Eli’s collection and his plans for Wagon Land Adventure) won’t work on your computer, click here to go directly to YouTube.

Today: an unusual vehicle from Mr. Sallmann’s collection of Swiss carriages and sleighs.

This odd-looking contraption is known as a Gemmiwagen (named after the Gemmi Pass in the Bernese Alps).

.

.

Melanie reports that (as you can see in this photo of a photo of one in use), it could serve as a form of courting vehicle. In this case, the gentleman would ground-drive the horse while being able to chat with his lady friend. And she wouldn’t have to be bothered to climb the steep Swiss mountain roads.

.

.

This photo shows the contraption on the seat back that makes it adjustable, to accommodate the incline of the road:

.

.

And, finally, here’s an old photo of a young lady about to set out for a ride in a Gemmiwagen:

.

.

To see photos of some of the oldest vehicles in Mr. Sallman’s collection, stay tuned for the May issue of The Carriage Journal.

CAA member Melanie Brooker (California) was in Europe not too long ago, and she made a point of scheduling a visit with Robert Sallmann (a CAA life member who lives in Switzerland) to tour his impressive carriage collection.

She sent many more photos for the “In the Carriage House” department in The Carriage Journal (coming up in the May issue) than we can possibly use, so I thought I would share some of the extras here.

.

this Cabrio-Landau was used in Interlaken, Switzerland

.

in 1973, Robert Sallmann and his family spent a week driving this vehicle from their home in Amriswil to St. Mortiz, a journey of about 120 miles

.

Melanie wrote, “This Feder-Chaise was my favorite vehicle in Mr. Sallmann’s collection. Feder translates to Spring in English, so this would be a Spring Chaise. It has lovely C-springs front and rear; it also has a built-in weather apron and a glass windshield.”

.

Here are a few other carriages and some of the many sleighs in Mr. Sallmann’s collection:

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

« Previous PageNext Page »