… continuing from yesterday …

“I had not been here more than an hour before a team came along the right trail and stopped when he got to me. I said, ‘Stranger, I have been trying to travel since the storm, but my horse slips so bad I am afraid she will injure herself.’ [He replied,] ‘I am in the same fix. It is dangerous traveling; I have been traveling an hour down the mountains, and my horse has been down twice. I am looking for water. Antelope Springs are not far from here. Have you come past them, stranger?’ ‘No, sir,’ I answered. ‘Then they must be on this [other] trail.’

“[I asked if he was alone.] ‘No, stranger; there is another team a little ways back.’ ‘Where are you from?’ I asked. ‘I am from Laramie. Where are you from?’ asked the stranger. ‘I am from Ogden.’ ‘You, from Ogden!’ I am going there and then to Salt Lake City,’ said the stranger. ‘What! Are you a Mormon?’ ‘No, I am not a Mormon. Are you?’ asked the stranger. ‘No, I am not, but I know something about them, as I have lived amongst them some eight months. I left Ogden on the 14th and have come so far since that time.’ ‘Where are you going to?’ asked the stranger. ‘I am going to Laramie,’ I replied. ‘How is the road to Ogden? What rivers have you forded?’ ‘I forded Bear river, Muddy creek, Hams Fork, and Bitter creek. These are all of any account; small creeks are the worst to cross,’ I answered. He went on up the left trail, I following in his rear.

“We had gone but a short distance when we came to a small creek, where we stopped and gave our cattle water. We then went on our way and came to a good valley where we found a herd of horses, ninety in number, in charge of them were two men, who were bound to Laramie.

“Here, we also found an emigrant train, twelve in number, bound for Oregon. Entering this valley, on our left are the springs, known as Antelope Springs. It is three o’clock and all propose to stop until we can travel. There is not much grass but plenty of water. The herd of horses have eaten nearly all the grass. I secured the cow with her lariat, the horse I dared not turn loose, nor stake her out. This is a wonderful place; not more than fifty acres in extent, almost surrounded by mountains. There are two entrances to the valley: one from the East and one from the West. A fine harbor it makes; only one thing is lacking, that is wood. Not a particle of fuel can be found, it has been so closely gathered up. I was informed that here was the best water to be found between Ogden and Laramie.

“Here I will say that, if I ever travel in this manner again, I will carry an oil stove for cooking purposes; it will save much labor in gathering fuel. You can gather sage brush, but wood is almost out of the question across the plains.”