Mr. Johnson continued his tale from where we left him in yesterday’s post …

“On the morning of the 28th I was up again before it was light enough to travel. I gave my cattle grain, but they would not touch it they were so thirsty. As soon as light came I drove into the trail and moved on. I knew that my cattle must have water, so I drove on as fast as possible; after traveling about eight miles, we came to water, which I tested and found it fair water, so I gave to the cattle as much as they would drink. After which I gave them their grain, and while they were eating had a breakfast of crackers and milk. I did not stop long, but went on and about ten o’clock met a man on horseback, leading a pack-horse. ‘Good morning, stranger,’ I said. ‘Good morning, sir.’ ‘How far have you come this morning?’ I asked.  ‘About ten or twelve miles,’ he said. ‘Did your horses have grass last night?’ I asked. ‘No, not any; I should have stopped at the creek, there was grass there,’ he said. ‘How is the trail on ahead?’ I asked. ‘First best for me; I can go anywhere as I am, you can’t with your wagon.’ ‘Where are you going to?’ I asked. ‘I am going to California,’ he said. ‘California; I am just from there.’ ‘You from California; what, you have not come from California with that outfit?’ he asked. ‘I have; just as I am, and I am going East, to Massachusetts,’ I answered. ‘The devil you are. Well, I will give it up, if you have come so far, I think I ought to do as much; goodbye, stranger.’ ‘Goodbye, sir.’ We parted and went on, I saying, ‘Well, Fanny and Bessie, we must make that creek before night. There is grass; you did not get any last night, tonight you may get some.’

“On we went, a good trail and down grade; we are traveling at the rate of three miles an hour, and about four p.m., I made a stop of about thirty minutes, giving the cattle some grain, after which we went on. Talking to my horse I said, ‘Come, Fanny, do your best, it is a good road, you shall have grass tonight.’ I was crowding along as fast as I could, when looking off to my left, saw smoke, and soon I came to tracks of wagons and was sure there was a camp somewhere near. When the horse saw the tracks she stopped, looking around. I said, ‘Fanny, we will go in here and follow those tracks and see what we can find.’ Traveling around a bluff we came in sight of a camp — a tent and three wagons and eight horses; five men, a boy, two women, and a girl. As I went into the camp I called out, ‘Don’t be afraid, I have come to see who is here!’ ‘Come in, stranger; you are welcome,’ was answered. ‘I am going East and you are going West, I suppose. Can I stop with you tonight; or, in other words, can I go into camp here?’ I asked. ‘Yes, sir; you can,’ was answered.

“I detached the horse from the wagon and unharnessed her, turning her loose and she went rolling about for some time. I gave the cow the same chance, but she went for the grass. It is half-past six and I went to gather fuel for a fire. ‘Stranger, do your cooking by our fire; don’t trouble yourself in making a fire.’ I got my supper, such as coffee, boiled eggs, crackers, and milk. I brought in my cattle for the night, securing and giving them their grain, made up my bed, and went to rest.”

to be continued …