… continued from yesterday’s post …

“On the morning of the 18th I was up and around early, getting ready to go on and about six o’clock broke camp for Muddy Creek, which I reached about ten o’clock. This creek is about four rods across; had it been six, it would have been much better to cross. A large body of water flows past and its banks are full and overflowing. A short distance below the ford, there is a bend in the river which sets the water back, making the ford deep, with a strong current.

“It was discouraging; I felt blue and being all alone I was disheartened. In order to ascertain the depth of the water, I took out my horse, got on to her back and made an attempt to cross, but she would not go into the water. I made several attempts, but with no further success. It was a warm day and I remembered what the man said at Evanston: ‘The warmer the day, the higher the river.’ I went back to my wagon, removed the harness and turned the horse loose, the cow also. I returned to the river and made a mark, so that I could tell whether the water was rising or falling.

“I then returned to my carriage, gathered some wood and made a fire; made some coffee, boiled some eggs, and ate my dinner. Having some oil, I concluded to give my harness a good limbering up. Several times I went to the river to see whether the water was higher or lower. Before night, the river had fallen about four inches, and I thought that by morning I should be able to cross.”

… to be continued …