Even though Semana Santa and Easter are behind us, I think we’ll stay in Sevilla for a couple more days.

Going back to our Glimpses of the World book, here’s a late-nineteenth-century interior photo of the Real Alcázar … which is remarkable because the rooms are shown furnished.

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The book’s caption for this photo says: “The Alcázar (a name derived from Al Kasr, the “house of Caesar”) is a Moorish palace, begun when Arabian Caliphs ruled in Spain in 1181. It was, however, largely rebuilt by the [fourteenth-century] Christian sovereign, Pedro the Cruel. The room portrayed in this illustration is the boudoir of Maria de Padilla, the beautiful lady whom Pedro loved and secretly married. … The Alcázar of Sevilla is in some respects more beautiful than the Alhambra. At all events its Moorish ornamentation has suffered less from the ravages of Time and Man. Its exquisite tile-work and the stucco tapestry of its walls are like mantles of finely woven lace. Behind this palace are lovely gardens, laid out by Charles V, and abounding in myrtle hedges and orange groves, bright with their glistening leaves and fruit of gold. The windows of this apartment command a view of those gardens, and no doubt the beautiful Maria de Padilla has often looked out upon their charming terraces and breathed their perfume-laden air.”

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If you were to tour the Real Alcázar today, you could wander through gorgeous — but empty — rooms, and lovely courtyards and gardens.

Here are a few glimpses of the elaborately beautiful walls and doorways in the Real Alcázar, which I took in 2010:

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