If you’re still following along with my trip back to Spain for Holy Week, here is a lovely (about half-an-hour-long) video of a portion of the Easter Sunday “Resurrection” procession in Sevilla. Each procession has two pasos: one that depicts a particular point in the Holy Week story, and one that features an elaborately dressed Virgin Mary. The pasos, many of them hundreds of years old, are carried along their route by a multitude of men who are underneath the paso. The points in the videos you may’ve watched from Friday’s post and in this one, where the paso stops, is when those men have a bit of a break. Then you can sometimes hear the bang of a doorknocker-type contraption that is the signal for the men to hoist the paso back up and begin its “dance” down the street. All of this is unbelievably impressive in person, especially given their size and apparent weight, but you can get a feel for it from these various videos.

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When I followed this particular procession on Easter Sunday 2011, the candles on the Virgin’s paso had burned way down and were dripping wax rather alarmingly by the third time I saw her, in the early afternoon. And I think people on balconies along the route must toss rose petals onto the fabric of the canopy as she passes by, because by that third time I saw her, petals came floating down every time the paso was hoisted back up.

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Again, if the embedded video won’t play, click here to watch it on YouTube.