When we last checked in with Mr. Johnson, he was saying goodbye to the friends he’d met in Reno and heading back out on the road …

“I left Reno on the 24 of August [1882], and reached Wadsworth on the 25th, a distance of thirty-four miles. It was about four o’clock in the morning when I left. In journeying to Wadsworth, we follow the railroad and the Truckee river — river on your right and railroad on your left, with carriage road on both sides of railroad right and left. The river is very crooked, especially as it winds through the canyon. Both rail and carriage roads are on the north side of the river. The railroad crowds the highway in many places. The river here takes a heavy bend to the left close up to the bluff. The old trail used to be between the river and the bluff; the railroad took possession of the bluff, throwing the carriage road more on the mountain; at another place, where the river ran close to the bluffs the railroad was obliged to cut back into the bluff to make room for the highway. This cost the railway company a large sum of money, and it may yet cost them much more. This is a dangerous place and should there ever be a collision in this narrow pass, the cars would surely be thrown into the river and prove a complete wreck.”

Tomorrow, Mr. Johnson backtracks a bit and gives us a description of the town of Reno …