For our next look at a London scene from the 1892 Glimpses of the World book, we have this busy street outside the Bank of England:

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In the street are pedestrians, a wagon loaded with barrels, at least one passenger vehicle, a Hansom Cab, and what appears to be either a coach or an Omnibus with passengers seated on top.

The book’s caption for this photo says, in part:

“In the very heart of the city of London stands a low-browed, massive structure, streaked with soot and without even a window in its outer walls. It is the Bank of England. This absence of windows is supposed to give greater security to its valuable contents, the light within being received from interior courts and skylights. The structure looks therefore like a gigantic strong-box, covering four acres of territory! This establishment, though a national institution, is itself a private corporation. Its capital is about seventy-five million dollars, and its bullion alone is supposed to be at least one hundred and twenty-five million dollars in value. Its affairs are managed by a governor, a deputy governor, twenty-four directors, and nine hundred clerks. Below the surface of the ground there are more rooms in this structure than on the ground floor.”