Continuing on from yesterday’s post, we have two variations on what the Buckeye Buggy Co. called a “Duquisa,” one with the driver’s seat [boot] and one without. The Carriage Terminology book doesn’t list Duquisas per se, but it does say that Duquesas were a type of Phaeton, somewhat resembling a Victoria.

As we learned yesterday, Victorias belong to the Cabriolet family of vehicles, based on their body shape.

Here’s what Mr. Berkebile said about Victorias specifically:

“This carriage is believed to have had its beginnings in England, in both the George IV Phaeton, a variation of which was built for Queen Victoria in 1850, and in the Cab Phaeton. Some of the designs of these carriages migrated to the Continent, where, being more favorably received than in England, they resulted in the vehicle known as the Milord. First used as an aristocratic pleasure carriage, the Milord soon degenerated into a public hack, and after 1850 lost favor among the gentry. The term Victoria was applied by the French to some of these carriages at least as early as 1844, in honor of the English Queen. In 1869, the Victoria returned to England when the Prince of Wales imported one from Paris, and Baron Rothschild imported one from Vienna, following which it gained an immense popularity among both the English and American aristocracy.

“Adaptable for use with either one or two horses, the Victoria has but one seat-board, and a curving dash that is reminiscent of the George IV Phaeton, with the driver’s seat being supported by an iron framework over the dash. Occasionally, a rumble was added. A variation of the Victoria is the panel-boot Victoria, sometimes called a Cabriolet. The forward portion of the body differs from the true Victoria in having a paneled driver’s seat, framed to the body proper, with a straight, conventional dash standing in front of the seat. Many have a child’s seat that folds out of the rear of the panel-boot. Suspension of both these vehicles may be on four elliptics, elliptics and platform springs, C-springs, or double suspension.

“The Victoria was mainly a park carriage in England and the United States, and was more stately in form than the Cabriolet. In Europe, the driver’s seat was sometimes removed from the Victoria, and the carriage was driven with postilions.”

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The first of our Buckeye Buggy Co. Duquisas / Victorias has the driver’s seat attached:

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… And the second example has the driver’s seat removed. According to Mr. Berkebile, this may have meant the carriage would be driven postilion. Even though her carriage, as shown, has no coachman’s seat and no rumble-seat for a groom, I’m not sure that the lady in this illustration would’ve actually been out driving in the park with just her dogs to accompany her, but who knows …

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