I’m using this image (from the CMA Library’s wonderful collection) in a project and thought you might enjoy seeing it as well …

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I was also reminded of the last time I used this image, in an article on Dog-carts (by the late Tom Ryder), in the August issue of the magazine. If you’re a CAA member and/or a subscriber to The Carriage Journal, you may have already read this, but in case you’re not (yet), or in case you missed it, here’s an excerpt:

“The name ‘Dog-cart’ had its origin in the shooting carts that had accommodation for hunting dogs such as pointers or setters; they first appeared in the early years of the nineteenth century. These carts seated four persons, back to back, and provided accommodation for a pair of dogs under the seat. Venetian slats in the sides of the cart allowed a free flow of air for the dogs under the seat. The four-wheeled version of the Dog-cart had its original in the Shooting Phaeton of the late eighteenth century. The type was called a Double Dog-cart or Dog-cart Phaeton by some makers.”

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Here’s an image of a Dog-cart (almost) in use:

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